CADDAC Policy Papers

Equitable Access to Education for all Canadians –Students with ADHD continue to fall through the cracks in our education systems. Students who are impaired due to their ADHD continue to be denied the official identification and appropriate accommodations that would allow them to reach their academic potential. READ MORE


Equality of Access for Canadians to New Medication – Medication should never be the only treatment for ADHD, however for many it can be an important part of a multimodal treatment approach. Despite this, long-acting or extended release (XR) medications, the clinically-recommended READ MORE


First-line treatment for ADHD, is not covered by all Canadian public and some private medical insurance plans. READ MORE


ADHD and Special Education across Canada, “2010 Provincial Report Card: ADHD in the School System” In 2010 CADDAC published a report on how students with ADHD were recognized as having learning needs in Canada. The main goal of this exercise was to ascertain whether or not students with ADHD have equitable access to educational accommodations, across all of Canada, as do other students with impairments such as learning disabilities. This report outlines how these systems impact students with ADHD and grades them.  READ MORE


Paying Attention to the Cost of ADHD… The Price Paid by Canadian Families, Governments and Society – This paper examines some of the known costs of ADHD and indicates what the Canadian and provincial governments might do to reduce these significant long-term costs.   Left untreated, ADHD impedes an individual’s ability to attain human and social capital and thereby impacts the Canadian economy.  READ MORE


Understanding ADHD as a Disability in the Post-Secondary Environment – This paper outlines the lack of national or provincial standards backed by medical research defining what medical documentation should be required of students with ADHD by post-secondary schools to qualify  them for academic accommodations. Some post-secondary institutions are demanding that expensive and unnecessary psychoeducational testing be done before students are eligible for the necessary accommodations. This is resulting in discriminatory practices potentially leaving colleges and universities open to legal challenge. READ MORE


ADHD and the Justice System: The Benefits of Recognizing and Treating ADHD in Canadian Justice and Correction Systems – Incident rates of ADHD seen in the correctional population are 5 times that of adults, and ten times that of youth in the general population. Screening, early detection and appropriate treatment would reduce recidivism rates and costs to the justice and correction systems.  ENGLISH  FRENCH